A Properly Written Will

Your last will and testament can be simple and straightforward, just the same as your estate plan developed and finalized with the help of our firm. In the end, your will is an expression of sentiments to loved ones and a legal documentation of your end-of-life intentions regarding property distribution, estate management, personal end-of-life care, and care for minor children and disabled dependents. If you have minor children or a dependent adult relative, your will is the only vehicle that can nominate a guardian or conservator for his or her care.

There are many reasons to have a legally valid will other than property distribution. It can be a simple process, but you must make sure your will and estate plan are legally valid and capable of standing up in court.

At Lance A. Riddle Law Office, Attorneys at Law, we can guide you through the process of creating and updating your will accordingly in Missouri. You should review your will with an estate planning lawyer at least once every five years and after any significant life events.

Saving Time And Money With Nonprobate Transfers

Nonprobate transfers allow you to retain property while you are alive but indicate to whom each of your assets should be transferred to upon your death, providing your assets the capability of avoiding the formalities and costs of the probate process. Our lawyers can help ensure that the necessary notations are made on financial documents, vehicle titles and real estate deeds.

Nonprobate transfers are flexible and efficient:

  • They can be modified or revoked by the owner at any time.
  • They do not require approval of the probate court.
  • They are simple to create and do not require a will.

What Should Be In Your Will?

Once finalized, your will can bring you peace of mind in life and protect your beneficiaries in your death. It can minimize tax burdens and help your survivors avoid a long probate process.

Your will should contain:

  1. A plan for the distribution of your estate assets, including instructions regarding trusts.
  2. Designation of a personal representative ("estate executor") to oversee management of assets, collection of debts, sale of property, transition of trusts, and filing of all required legal and tax documents after you die.
  3. Letters of instruction regarding powers of attorney and durable powers of attorney and advance health care directives.
  4. Letters of instruction regarding guardianship and conservatorship intentions for minor children and dependent adults.

If you do not have these pieces in place before you are unable to make financial or health care decisions for yourself, the processes of financial and health care management and of designating a guardian for a child, dependent adult or your own care will be far more time-consuming and expensive.

Speak With Attorney Kati A. Roach About Your Will Today

Please call our Warrensburg office at 660-747-6600 to schedule a free initial consultation with attorney Roach. You may also contact us for prompt response through our secure online contact form. We look forward to speaking with you.